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Time and Again
by Jack Finney (1970)


Simon Morley is chosen for a secret government project involving some time-tripping investigative work. Einstein's theory that the past exists simultaneously with the present is put to the test and Morley is hypnotically transported to 1880s New York. Ethical dilemmas abound when he falls in love with his landlady's daughter and is asked to change history. Nice blend of fantasy and sci-fi.





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'Saga of the Pliocene Exile'
by Julian May (1981)


One-way time tunnels allow misfits wanting more than the 22nd century can offer a way to the Pliocene Epoch. While the premise of May's Saga of the Exile may sound science fictional, upon arriving in prehistoric times everything that follows is pure fantasy. Well researched with an intricate plotline that holds the imagination, but getting hard to find.





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The Anubis Gates
by Tim Powers (1983)


Landmark 'steampunk' novel from one of the subgenre's progenitors Tim Powers. A mild-mannered professor trips back to 1810 England where the colonisation of Egypt by Western powers triggers some bizarre encounters with sorcerers, werewolves, famous poets and other oddities. Fabulous book that stands up to repeated readings.





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Moonheart
by Charles de Lint (1984)


Urban fantasy with a Canadian feel - two young women are drawn to a long-forgotten world of myth and magic by some seemingly ordinary artifacts they discover. The story moves between ancient Wales and present-day Ottawa, largely focusing on de Lint's fascination with folk music. An author who writes with great understanding and sensitivity.





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Replay
by Ken Grimwood (1987)


A book that examines the question, "What if you could live your life over again?" Radio journalist Jeff Winston dies in 1988 and wakes up as an 18 year old in 1963 with his memories of the future intact. Sounds like a dream come true, but the problem is that the same thing happens again every 25 years. Topnotch book with a strong cult following.





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'The Assiti Shards'
by Eric Flint (2000)


Although tagged as an 'alternative history', this series is really about people rather than events. The First Book, 1632, has a small West Virginian community getting hurtled back in time to Germany during the Thirty Years War. Its residents go about turning things topsy turvy. Very reminiscent of Mark Twain's Connecticut Yankee Americanisation fantasy.





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'Thursday Next'
by Jasper Fforde (2002)


The success of 'The Eyre Affair' prompted the 'Thursday Next' series. In an alternative mid-80s Britain time travel is commonplace, cloned dodos are popular pets and literary homicide is a serious crime. Literary detective Thursday Next enters a Bronte novel to stop an arch-villain from knocking Jane Eyre off the pages. Side-splittingly funny, as are the other books in the series.





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The Time Traveler's Wife
by Audrey Niffenegger (2003)


Bestselling sci-fi/fantasy romance in which a gentlemanly librarian has to cope with his 'chrono displacement disorder' - a time tripping disease with no respect for basic human dignity. Aside from running into himself a few times, he also unknowingly first encounters his future wife when she is only six. Absolutely beautiful and well worthy of the success it is enjoying.


Time Twists
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