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Little, Big
by John Crowley (1981)


Award-winning novel packed with romance, humour and plenty of quirks. When Smoky Barnable falls in love with Daily Alice Drinkwater (getting the picture?) he heads off to Edgewood, her family home. Edgewood is a Rod Serling type of place in that it's not on any map and absolutely isn't what it seems to be. Topnotch urban fantasy.





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'Darkness Trilogy'
by Frank E Peretti (1986)


Pacey Christian thrillers with the power of prayer proving handy in the war of the New Age. Starting in the small town of Aston, a sceptical reporter and a prayerful Pastor team up to fight the evil rulers of a great darkness set to envelop humankind. This is Christianity with attitude and plenty of in-your-face grunt. Hard to find, but has previously been available in a value pack.





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Weaveworld
by Clive Barker (1987)


Barker tones down the horror in this well constructed fantasy tale of the Fugue - a magical land that has been woven into a carpet for protection. When its guardian dies evil rears its ugly head in a bid for control of the Fugue. A Liverpool clerk gets drawn into the Weaveworld of the Seerkind while humanity's existence goes on the line.





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'Newford'
by Charles de Lint (1993)


World Fantasy Award winning author who helped popularise the genre of urban fantasy in the 1980s. In the music clubs, the waterfront, and the alleyways - ancient myths and magic spill into the modern world. In this world, Gemmins live in abandoned cars and skells traverse the tunnels below, while mermaids swim in the grey harbor waters and fill the cold night with their song.





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The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
by Haruki Murakami (1994)


Toru Okada loses his job, goes searching for his wife's cat… then she goes missing too. He ends up in a Tokyo netherworld in some unusual company that includes an elderly war veteran of the Manchurian campaign. Murakami is a master of the bizarre and here continues his examination of Japanese society, with war atrocities the centrepiece of some incisive social commentary.





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'The Prince of Nothing'
by R Scott Bakker (2004)


Bakker's debut contains a few rookie mistakes that have put a few people off, but there is little doubting his enormous potential. Book One in the Prince of Nothing series starts off with two prologues before getting into the story of a mysterious messiah-type character who arrives on the verge of the Second Apocalypse. Richly imagined, complex and very dark.





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World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War
by Max Brooks (2006)


From the man who brought you 'The Zombie Survival Guide', comes an equally straight-faced account of the Zombie War. The claim in the promo blurb is that Brooks, "spent years travelling to every part of the globe in order to conduct the face-to-face interviews". As a former Saturday Night Live writer Brooks is no stranger to slinging more than a few socio-political barbs and arrows.





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'The Mortal Instruments'
by Cassandra Clare (2007)


The original Mortal Instruments trilogy kicks off when Clary Fray witnesses a supernatural murder mundies (mundane humans) shouldn't be able to see. She subsequently becomes involved in the dark world of the demon-killing Shadowhunters. Based on the trilogy's success, in 2009 Clare flagged the publication of a second Mortal Instruments cycle.


Urban Fantasy
Fantasies with urban settings and portals to other worlds
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